Personal SWOT Analysis

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Personal SWOT Analysis

Overview:

Through the readings and the lectures this week, we have discussed the nature of service-learning and the gains that can often be associated with community involvement. We have also discussed the meaning of community and the importance of becoming active in its betterment. While it is valuable to look at our communities and assess the problems that need to be addressed and the opportunities to aid in solving those issues, it is important to start by assessing our own strengths and weaknesses to identify opportunities to better ourselves.

This week’s assignment is all about you. Unlike the other assignments in this course, your work in this assignment will be a private conversation (of sorts) between you and your instructor. Be as honest as you can in your assessment so you can use this information to make the most of your education as you move forward in this class and through your future learning experiences.

What is a SWOT analysis

If you are a business student, chances are, you’ve been asked to create a SWOT analysis on a company or organization in one or more of your previous courses. For other students, this may be a new experience. In either case, you should find this a useful tool.

A SWOT analysis is a tool for evaluating the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (or SWOT) associated with something—usually a company, organization, or project, but can be applied to analyze an idea, an argument, or, as we are doing in this assignment, a person.

We separate the ideas of strengths and weaknesses as internal factors (personal strengths and weaknesses), from the ideas of opportunities and threats as external factors(outside opportunities and threats to learning). These factors are usually presented in a chart with bullet-points followed by a brief narrative about each factor.

Internal Factors

Strengths

SWOT

Analysis

Opportunities

External Factors

Weaknesses

Threats

The first step in completing a SWOT analysis is to identify the specific areas being analyzed. For the purposes of this assignment, you are asked to analyze the skills you acquired throughout your general education so far. The categories we will analyze are defined as:

1. Communication skills;

2. Critical thinking skills;

3. Respect for diversity;

4. Professional, social, and ethical responsibility; and

5. Lifelong learning practices

(see “University Learning Outcomes” as defined in the Grantham University Catalog).

Assignment Criteria:

Complete a personal SWOT analysis evaluating your understanding and skills in the five following categories:

1. Communication skills;

2. Critical thinking skills;

3. Respect for diversity;

4. Professional, social, and ethical responsibility; and

5. Lifelong learning practices

Your assignment should include:

A SWOT graph with bullet-points defining your strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats as they relate to the five university learning objectives.
A brief narrative describing each defined trait.
There is no page-length requirement for this assignment, however; you should make every effort to provide a complete and accurate personal analysis. Pay close attention to detail, including grammar, usage, design, and depth. You may want to take the time to create several drafts before submitting the final version of this assignment.

assignment 2

The Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity

The following topic(s) will demonstrate what the discussion is about, but feel free to branch off or expand on the topics. In addition to this discussion, you will be asked to craft a 150 word reflection on what you have learned through this conversation and post it to the Reflection Journal. The more active you are in this part of the discussion, the more you will have to draw from in your reflection, so get involved, be active, help out your classmates when they need it, and, most of all, enjoy the conversation.

As culturally aware as we may be, we all see the world through the lenses of our own cultural experiences, and even the greatest among us struggle to understand people who are different from us. For this discussion, review the Developmental Model of Intercultural Sensitivity on pages 81-85 of the Learning through Servingtext. Which one of these six stages do you find yourself in Why do you think that is, and what do you think you could do to help you climb to the next level Remember, we are all learning and growing here, so there are no right or wrong answers, so long as we are being honest with ourselves and others.

Assignment 3

Preparing for the Final Project: Outlining Your Goals, Intentions, and Approach

Outlining Your Goals, Intentions, and Approach

If you haven’t done so recently, review the “Preview of Your Final Project” criteria sheet. For this assignment, provide an outline with your goals, intentions, and approach for your Final Project.

Identify the role of the Community Organization for your project. You should utilize all the information that you collected since the beginning of this course.

Please feel free to use any type of outline you would like, but keep in mind, you will need to cover the information below with consistency, continuity, and originality. Because this is an outline, you will have the opportunity to make changes to this as you progress through the project, but the more you can “nail down” here, the more you will be able to stay focused moving forward.

Note: If you use any resources in your outline, cite the publication(s), any direct quotations, and any summarized or paraphrased material. Use APA citation format for both your in-text and references page citations.

Keep in mind, any sources you choose should be no more than five (5) years old. This is part of the requirements for your Final Project.

Title Your Project: Be concise; be catchy. Use your title to both draw your readers/audience in and to demonstrate what the project is about. Try to keep your titles within five or fewer words.
Introduction: Describe the organization, the work they do, any key players within the organization, and why it may be interesting to your readers/audience. Include your thesis statement (a short description of the purpose of your work).
Readers/Audience: Describe the readers/audience you will be directing your project toward. Consider what they know, what they might need from your work, and what they will expect. Briefly discuss how you will meet the needs of your readers/audience.
Methods: Include a description of how you plan to gather and analyze your data (i.e. reviewing websites, reviewing related articles, interviews, analyzing similar organizations, and so on).
Results: You likely haven’t found any results yet, but provide a description of what you hope to find or what you think you might find.
Conclusion: Based on the information you have gathered so far, start identifying how what you’ve learned connects to your thesis and how it falls under the scope of service-learning and civic engagement. Write up a brief description of those connections.
References Page: Include an APA style citation list of any sources you have used or are considering using in your project (this should appear on its own page at the end of your outline).

Assignment 4

Preparing for the Final Project: Outlining Your Goals, Intentions, and Approach

Outlining Your Goals, Intentions, and Approach

If you haven’t done so recently, review the “Preview of Your Final Project” criteria sheet. For this assignment, provide an outline with your goals, intentions, and approach for your Final Project.

Identify the role of the Community Organization for your project. You should utilize all the information that you collected since the beginning of this course.

Please feel free to use any type of outline you would like, but keep in mind, you will need to cover the information below with consistency, continuity, and originality. Because this is an outline, you will have the opportunity to make changes to this as you progress through the project, but the more you can “nail down” here, the more you will be able to stay focused moving forward.

Note: If you use any resources in your outline, cite the publication(s), any direct quotations, and any summarized or paraphrased material. Use APA citation format for both your in-text and references page citations.

Keep in mind, any sources you choose should be no more than five (5) years old. This is part of the requirements for your Final Project.

Title Your Project: Be concise; be catchy. Use your title to both draw your readers/audience in and to demonstrate what the project is about. Try to keep your titles within five or fewer words.
Introduction: Describe the organization, the work they do, any key players within the organization, and why it may be interesting to your readers/audience. Include your thesis statement (a short description of the purpose of your work).
Readers/Audience: Describe the readers/audience you will be directing your project toward. Consider what they know, what they might need from your work, and what they will expect. Briefly discuss how you will meet the needs of your readers/audience.
Methods: Include a description of how you plan to gather and analyze your data (i.e. reviewing websites, reviewing related articles, interviews, analyzing similar organizations, and so on).
Results: You likely haven’t found any results yet, but provide a description of what you hope to find or what you think you might find.
Conclusion: Based on the information you have gathered so far, start identifying how what you’ve learned connects to your thesis and how it falls under the scope of service-learning and civic engagement. Write up a brief description of those connections.
References Page: Include an APA style citation list of any sources you have used or are considering using in your project (this should appear on its own page at the end of your outline).