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Final Paper Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)

Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK): This framework demonstrates the combination of content expertise, information delivery expertise (pedagogy), and instructional technology implementation all used to enhance learning.As explained in your textbook, TPACK combines pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge, and technological knowledge to transform learning opportunities into student-centered opportunities for lesson engagement, global connections, and web interfacing through 21st century technology advancements. The TPACK framework demonstrates the interplay of three knowledge bases:
· Pedagogical Content Knowledge: This area is where most teachers have their foundation as a content expert who delivers knowledge using the foundations of pedagogy.
· Technological Content Knowledge: This area includes making content more accessible and differentiated through technology including graphing calculators, online language translators, and virtual world tours.

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· Technological Pedagogical Knowledge: This area involves advanced learning processes through the use of technology that contribute to a wider variety of differentiated instructional opportunities including iPads that have text to speech programs, SMARTboard with text magnification, and online educational games that provide immediate feedback.
Assignment InstructionsUsing the classroom environment and the demographics created in Week Two, the instructional strategies that align with the CCSS in the blog created in Week Three, the unit plan created in Week Four, and the summative assessment created in Week Five, you will create the framework for a TPACK lesson plan.
· Identify the following aspects of your lesson plan:
o Title: The title of your lesson.
o Grade level and basic class demographics.
o Anticipated Outcome (Lesson Objective): This must be measurable and written to align with the CCSS.
o Common Core State Standard: This can be from your Unit Plan.
o NETS-T standard standard being met.
o Content Summary: A brief description of what you will teach for this lesson and why.
o Materials: Provide a list of materials needed for the lesson to include hyperlinks to any internet sites or books citations.
o Summative Assessment: This should be a two- to three-sentence summary of how you will assess the lesson.
· Your lesson plan must address each section of the TPACK using the provided lesson plan template (see sample here):
o Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Explain which teaching strategies best address the lesson’s content and concept. Be sure to include how the lesson uses multiple intelligences to promote critical thinking and problem solving in an engaging learning environment. You must also clearly explain how the Common Core State Standard (CCSS) aligns with this section.
o Technological Content Knowledge: Explain how instructional technology will be used to compliment the lesson’s content. For example- a graphing calculator is used to check student’s algebra work or using spell check in a word document. You must also clearly explain how the CCSS and NETS standard(s) aligns with this section.
o Technological Pedagogical Knowledge: Explain how the instructional technology device(s) included in your lesson enhance student learning and classroom organization (such as online attendance and grading). You must also clearly explain how the NETS standard(s) aligns with this section.
· Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK):
o Analyze how your lesson integrates Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK), and Technological Content Knowledge (TCK) to fully address TPACK in the creation of an engaging lesson that differentiates instruction, makes global connections through 21st century technological advancements, encourages critical thinking, and demonstrates content area expertise. The analysis will be at least two pages.
The assignment should be a minimum of four pages in length, not including the title and reference pages, and must include reference to the course text and two additional resources (scholarly article or online resource). The assignment must be cited in proper APA format. A title and reference page must be included.
Week 6 Final Paper Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK)
Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK): This framework demonstrates the combination of content expertise, information delivery expertise (pedagogy), and instructional technology implementation all used to enhance learning. As explained in your textbook, TPACK combines pedagogical knowledge, content knowledge, and technological knowledge to transform learning opportunities into student-centered opportunities for lesson engagement, global connections, and web interfacing through 21st century technology advancements. The TPACK framework demonstrates the interplay of three knowledge bases:
· Pedagogical Content Knowledge: This area is where most teachers have their foundation as a content expert who delivers knowledge using the foundations of pedagogy.
· Technological Content Knowledge: This area includes making content more accessible and differentiated through technology including graphing calculators, online language translators, and virtual world tours.
· Technological Pedagogical Knowledge: This area involves advanced learning processes through the use of technology that contribute to a wider variety of differentiated instructional opportunities including iPads that have text to speech programs, SMARTboard with text magnification, and online educational games that provide immediate feedback.
Assignment Instructions Using the classroom environment and the demographics created in Week Two, the instructional strategies that align with the CCSS in the blog created in Week Three, the unit plan created in Week Four, and the summative assessment created in Week Five, you will create the framework for a TPACK lesson plan.
· Identify the following aspects of your lesson plan:
· Title: The title of your lesson.
· Grade level and basic class demographics.
· Anticipated Outcome (Lesson Objective): This must be measurable and written to align with the CCSS.
· Common Core State Standard: This can be from your Unit Plan.
· NETS-T standard  standard being met.
· Content Summary: A brief description of what you will teach for this lesson and why.
· Materials: Provide a list of materials needed for the lesson to include hyperlinks to any internet sites or books citations.
· Summative Assessment: This should be a two- to three-sentence summary of how you will assess the lesson.
· Your lesson plan must address each section of the TPACK using the provided lesson plan template ( see sample here ):
· Pedagogical Content Knowledge: Explain which teaching strategies best address the lesson’s content and concept. Be sure to include how the lesson uses multiple intelligences to promote critical thinking and problem solving in an engaging learning environment. You must also clearly explain how the Common Core State Standard (CCSS) aligns with this section.
· Technological Content Knowledge: Explain how instructional technology will be used to compliment the lesson’s content. For example- a graphing calculator is used to check student’s algebra work or using spell check in a word document. You must also clearly explain how the CCSS and NETS standard(s) aligns with this section.
· Technological Pedagogical Knowledge: Explain how the instructional technology device(s) included in your lesson enhance student learning and classroom organization (such as online attendance and grading). You must also clearly explain how the NETS standard(s) aligns with this section.
· Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK):
· Analyze how your lesson integrates Pedagogical Content Knowledge (PCK), Technological Pedagogical Knowledge (TPK), and Technological Content Knowledge (TCK) to fully address TPACK in the creation of an engaging lesson that differentiates instruction, makes global connections through 21st century technological advancements, encourages critical thinking, and demonstrates content area expertise. The analysis will be at least two pages.
The assignment should be a minimum of four pages in length, not including the title and reference pages, and must include reference to the course text and two additional resources (scholarly article or online resource). The assignment must be cited in proper APA format. A title and reference page must be included.
Instructor Guidance
Week 6
 
Introduction
This week you will:
1. Apply a range of differentiated instructional strategies and assessments in a diverse learning environment.
2. Design classroom scenarios integrating best practice for digital technology and differentiated instruction.
3. Facilitate technology in differentiated learning community that respects information about students’ individual differences.
Welcome to the FINAL week of class!!! Give yourselves a HUGE pat on the back!
You are now equipped with differentiated instruction theoretical underpinnings that you can use to create a physical and academic environment, which embraces various learning modalities, is free of cultural bias, and engages learners at their level of readiness. In this final week of class, you will analyze authentic situations and suggest teaching strategies that include differentiation, Universal Design for Learning, and education technology tools to best meet students’ learning needs.
 
Discussion Board
As you have learned, the concept behind differentiated instruction is rather straight forward: vary instruction to meet individual student needs, including pacing, content delivery methods, real-world examples and high-interest application, and self-expression of subject mastery. When differentiating curriculum and class instruction for students with a disability, the same components apply. Keep in mind that getting to know the student’s learning styles is key to their success. For example, students with autism typically have sensory integration disorder which they can either listen to instruction or watch instruction. In this case, knowing your student is a visual learner will help you to differentiate instruction accordingly. Another idea on which to build for students with a disability, and really ALL students, is to move away from pencil/pen, paper, and textbooks, and on to other sensory regions. Studies show that information is processed in different areas of the brain depending on the input source such as visual, auditory, music, and olfactory (Royet et al., 2000); therefore, using a multisensory approach to instruction is a more effective method of curriculum delivery. However, there are also competing theories about how students learn (Riener & Willingham, 2010). For specific links and examples check out the following resources:
· ISTE Standards: Teachers 
· What is Multisensory Teaching Techniques?  (Links to an external site.) (Praveen, n.d.)
 
 
Assignment
To get started on this week’s assignment, please review this video (Nesbitt, 2007) about the range of student needs and interests in K-12 environments. Any time you can incorporate tablets, Smartphones, computers, or even graphing calculators into your lesson plan, students will be hooked; however, it is essential that before any instructional technology is used as a teaching tool, students know the basics of copyright protection, intellectual property, and proper citation and documentation for cited sources. Let’s start with a video (YouTube Spotlight, 2011) discussing copyright and fair use: There are many free resources available to teachers on copyright protections laws and fair use. For example, Teaching Copyright (Links to an external site.) (Electronic Frontier Foundation, n.d.) provides lesson plans, handouts, and a link to national standards. Students also need to be aware of intellectual property and proper citations. According to the Street Law (2013), intellectual property refers to copyrighted material, patents, trademarks, and trade secrets. Students who violate any of these areas of protected information are subjected to legal consequence of varying degrees depending on the severity. To help students clearly understand each of the four safeguarded domains, they created the “Educating to Protect Intellectual Property” online toolkit for teachers that include definitions, lesson plans, case studies, and additional resources to use in their classes. Additional tools you can provide for your students to use at home are found within many college courses. One particularly useful website is the Purdue University Online Writing Lab (Purdue University, 2014), to which all Ashford students have been directed. It is an extremely helpful website for creating proper attribution of others’ ideas.
 
References
Ashford University. (n.d.). APA key elements (Links to an external site.) . Retrieved from http://writingcenter.ashford.edu/introduction-apa
Electronic Frontier Foundation. (n.d.). Teaching copyright (Links to an external site.) . Retrieved from http://www.teachingcopyright.org/curriculum/hs Fayne, H., Weiss, A. (2014) Incorporating multisensory approaches in the secondary general education classroom. Retrieved from http://ohiorc.org/adlit/differentiated_instruction/fayne.aspx?id=multisensory
International Society for Technology in Education. (2008). ISTE Standards: Teachers . Retrieved from https://www.iste.org/standards/standards/standards-for-teachers
Nesbitt, B. (2007, November 28). A Vision of K-12 Students Today (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_A-ZVCjfWf8&feature=youtu.be Praveen, A. (n.d.). What is multisensory teaching techniques? (Links to an external site.)  Lexicon Reading Center. Retrieved from http://www.lexiconreadingcenter.org/what-is-multisensory-teaching-techniques/ Riener, C. & Willingham, D. (2010). The myth of learning styles. Change Magazine, Sept/Oct 2010, 33-35. Royet, J-P., Zald, D., Versace, R., Costes, N., Lavenne, R., Koenig, O., & Gervais, R. (2000). Emotional responses to pleasant and unpleasant olfactory, visual, and auditory stimuli: A positron emission tomography study. The journal of neuroscience 20(20), 7752-7759. YouTube Spotlight. (2011, March 24). YouTube copyright school (Links to an external site.) [Video file]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=InzDjH1-9Ns
Required Resources
Articles
Fee, L. (n.d.). Leveraging technology to differentiate instruction. (Links to an external site.)  Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/itsco/leveraging-technology-to-differentiate-instruction
Hackett, N., & Hasty, E. (2012, March). Differentiated instruction: How to ensure success for all students. Retrieved from http://irvington.k12.nj.us/depts/sdv/post_sub/12-13_Diff_Instr_Handbook.pdf
Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory. (n.d.). Focus on effectiveness: Education challenges. (Links to an external site.)  Retrieved from http://web.archive.org/web/20130511064149/http:/www.netc.org/focus/challenges
Multimedia
 
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